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Labor offers free childcare for lowest-income earners

News | May 1, 2019

Childcare will be free for hundreds of thousands of low-income families under a Labor plan to boost taxpayer-funded subsidies, if elected on May 18.

More than 880,000 families will be an average of $1200 a year better off per child with Labor planning to spend $4 billion to further reduce the out-of-pocket costs parents pay for child care. Read More

Labor promises $4b for free childcare

News | May 1, 2019

Labor leader Bill Shorten will promise free or almost free childcare for low- income families at a rally for the party faithful in Melbourne.

Mr Shorten will make the $4 billion election pledge on Sunday alongside deputy party leader Tanya Plibersek. Read More

Labor to act on child care gender pay gap

News | May 1, 2019

Bill Shorten has indicated Labor will soon announce plans for closing the gender pay gap, starting with early childhood educators.

The opposition leader foreshadowed the pledge while detailing Labor’s women’s policy platform in Melbourne on Friday. Read More

Election 2019: Labor pledges to give childcare workers a payraise

News | May 1, 2019

Bill Shorten will pledge to bring down the soaring cost of daycare for parents on Sunday but will mandate that childcare workers are guaranteed a pay rise under the deal.

The New Daily understands Labor will confirm the policy over the weekend, in one of the biggest announcements of the 2019 campaign. Read More

Labor to overhaul childcare subsidies if elected in multi-billion-dollar campaign pledge

News | May 1, 2019

A federal Labor Government would spend $4 billion over four years to make childcare free for most low-income households, and cheaper for families that earn up to $174,000.

Labor leader Bill Shorten said increasing the current subsidy from 85 per cent of the hourly fee cap to 100 per cent would make childcare free for about 370,000 families, saving them on average $1,400 a year. Read More

“I had no idea”: The story no one’s telling about early childhood educators in Australia.

News | Apr 1, 2019

My son started preschool this year.
The night before his first day, I cried.
I stayed awake until after midnight, labelling his clothes and preparing his lunch box and – for reasons I still don’t entirely understand, ironing his jean shorts. Read More

All you need to know about childcare funding before the national elections

News | Mar 28, 2019

We may not know the date we will be heading to the polls, but the Early Learning and Care Council of Australia (ELACCA) are ready for the campaign trail.

CEO Elizabeth Death outlines their campaign Launch into Learning and explains why they want national childcare funding to cover children aged between three and five. Read More

Federal Government warned to promote child care, not tax cuts in Federal Budget

News | Mar 28, 2019

Business leader and prominent Liberal Party supporter Tony Shepherd is warning the Federal Government not to go through with handing out tax cuts to households.

The Government has indicated it will announce billions of dollars’ worth of tax cuts to low and middle income households at next weeks’ budget. Read More

Launch into Learning issues Early Learning Report Card ahead of the NSW election

News | Mar 20, 2019

NSW voters who care about very young children’s access to early learning can take advantage of report card on the major parties early learning commitments before they vote on Saturday.

Spearheaded by the Early Learning and Care Council of Australia (ELACCA) on behalf of the nation’s largest early learning providers the report card released today carefully assesses funding promises for preschool programs, children facing disadvantage and support for educators and an ongoing commitment to quality. Read More

Media statement: Early learning is NOT about sitting behind desk

News | Mar 12, 2019

The nation’s largest preschool providers have rejected suggestions that preschool is the same as school.

“Unfortunately, some media reports today have confused early learning with school,” the CEO of the Early Learning and Care Council, Elizabeth Death said. Read More

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